Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana


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Horace urges his friend Sestius — vitae summa brevis spem nos vetat incohare longam The brief sum of life forbids us cling to far-off hope. Vipsanius Agrippa, the distinguished Roman Commander. The snow is deep and the frost is keen — Pile high the hearth and bring out old wine — Leave all else to the gods. It is vain to inquire into the future — Let us enjoy the present, for this is all we can command. It closes with the famous line: He exhorts it to beware of fresh perils and keep safely in harbor. He describes the sad effects of unbridled anger, and urges her to restrain hers.

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Si quid vacui sub umbra He implores her to preserve Augustus in his distant expeditions, and to save the state from ruinous civil wars. The tone of triumph over the fallen queen is tempered by a tribute of admiration to her lofty pride and resolute courage. A lament for the carnage caused by the conflicts of the Romans with their fellow-citizens. The love of gain grows by self-indulgence. The moderate man is the genuine king. Let us enjoy our life while we may, for death will soon strip us all alike of our possessions.

The poet prays that Tibur may be the resting-place of his old age; or, if that may not be, he will choose the country which lies around Tarentum. Valgius Rufus on the death of his son Mystes. Since all troubles have their natural end, do not mourn overmuch. Rather let us celebrate the latest victories of Augustus. The moderate life is the perfect life. He advises Maecenas to write in prose the history of Caesar's campaigns, while he himself will sing the praises of Licymnia some commentators say that Licymnia was another name for Terentia, the wife of Maecenas.

This same event is also alluded to in Odes, II. After expressing his indignation against the person who planted the tree, he passes to a general reflection on the uncertainty of life and the realms of dark Proserpine. Nothing can stay the advance of decay and death, the common doom of all on earth. Men pile up wealth, only for another to waste it. Contentment, not wealth, makes genuine happiness. The ancient editor Porphyrion read the first six odes of this book as a single sequence, one unified by a common moral purpose and addressed to all patriotic citizens of Rome.

The worthlessness of riches and rank. The praise of contentment. Care cannot be banished by change of scene. Juno's speech to the gods on the destiny of Rome. They also do so to Augustus, and prompt him to clemency and kindness.

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The evils of violence and arrogance, on the other hand, are exemplified by the Titans and Giants, and others. The disgraceful actions of the troops of Crassus who married Parthians after being taken prisoner are contrasted by the noble example of Regulus who was released from Carthage to negotiate a peace, but dissuaded the Senate, and then returned to Carthage to be tortured to death. The ode concludes with the tale of the daughters of Danaus, and their doom in the underworld.

Only thoughts of handsome Hebrus take her mind off her troubles. True contentment is to be satisfied with little, as Horace is with his Sabine farm. Valerius Messala Corvinus, sings of the manifold virtues of wine. A simple life like that of the Scythians is the healthiest and best. Stringent laws are needed to curb the present luxury and licentiousness. To win the title of a lyric poet is all that Horace desires. He imagines that the disaster is caused by the wrath of Ilia the wife of Tiber , the civil wars, and the assassination of Julius Caesar.

Augustus, as Mercury in human shape, is invoked to save the empire. Horace urges his friend Sestius — vitae summa brevis spem nos vetat incohare longam The brief sum of life forbids us cling to far-off hope. Vipsanius Agrippa, the distinguished Roman Commander. The snow is deep and the frost is keen — Pile high the hearth and bring out old wine — Leave all else to the gods.

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It is vain to inquire into the future — Let us enjoy the present, for this is all we can command. It closes with the famous line: He exhorts it to beware of fresh perils and keep safely in harbor. He describes the sad effects of unbridled anger, and urges her to restrain hers. Si quid vacui sub umbra He implores her to preserve Augustus in his distant expeditions, and to save the state from ruinous civil wars.

The tone of triumph over the fallen queen is tempered by a tribute of admiration to her lofty pride and resolute courage. A lament for the carnage caused by the conflicts of the Romans with their fellow-citizens. The love of gain grows by self-indulgence. The moderate man is the genuine king. Let us enjoy our life while we may, for death will soon strip us all alike of our possessions. The poet prays that Tibur may be the resting-place of his old age; or, if that may not be, he will choose the country which lies around Tarentum.

Valgius Rufus on the death of his son Mystes. Since all troubles have their natural end, do not mourn overmuch. Rather let us celebrate the latest victories of Augustus. The moderate life is the perfect life. He advises Maecenas to write in prose the history of Caesar's campaigns, while he himself will sing the praises of Licymnia some commentators say that Licymnia was another name for Terentia, the wife of Maecenas. This same event is also alluded to in Odes, II.

After expressing his indignation against the person who planted the tree, he passes to a general reflection on the uncertainty of life and the realms of dark Proserpine. Nothing can stay the advance of decay and death, the common doom of all on earth. Men pile up wealth, only for another to waste it.

Contentment, not wealth, makes genuine happiness.

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The ancient editor Porphyrion read the first six odes of this book as a single sequence, one unified by a common moral purpose and addressed to all patriotic citizens of Rome. The worthlessness of riches and rank.

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The praise of contentment. Care cannot be banished by change of scene. Juno's speech to the gods on the destiny of Rome. They also do so to Augustus, and prompt him to clemency and kindness. The evils of violence and arrogance, on the other hand, are exemplified by the Titans and Giants, and others.

The disgraceful actions of the troops of Crassus who married Parthians after being taken prisoner are contrasted by the noble example of Regulus who was released from Carthage to negotiate a peace, but dissuaded the Senate, and then returned to Carthage to be tortured to death. The ode concludes with the tale of the daughters of Danaus, and their doom in the underworld.


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Only thoughts of handsome Hebrus take her mind off her troubles. True contentment is to be satisfied with little, as Horace is with his Sabine farm. Valerius Messala Corvinus, sings of the manifold virtues of wine. A simple life like that of the Scythians is the healthiest and best. Stringent laws are needed to curb the present luxury and licentiousness. But he begs of Venus, as a last request, that his slighted love may not go unavenged.

Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana
Odes for a Princess: The Diana Poems: Eulogy for Princess Diana

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