THE QURAN


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The message has been identical and for all humankind. Angels acting as God's messengers deliver the divine revelation to them. This comes out in Quran Belief is a fundamental aspect of morality in the Quran, and scholars have tried to determine the semantic contents of "belief" and "believer" in the Quran. People are invited to perform acts of charity, especially for the needy. Believers who "spend of their wealth by night and by day, in secret and in public" are promised that they "shall have their reward with their Lord; on them shall be no fear, nor shall they grieve".

A number of practices, such as usury and gambling, are prohibited. The Quran is one of the fundamental sources of Islamic law sharia. Some formal religious practices receive significant attention in the Quran including the formal prayers salat and fasting in the month of Ramadan. As for the manner in which the prayer is to be conducted, the Quran refers to prostration. Charity, according to the Quran, is a means of self-purification. The astrophysicist Nidhal Guessoum while being highly critical of pseudo-scientific claims made about the Quran, has highlighted the encouragement for sciences that the Quran provides by developing "the concept of knowledge.

Quran in English. Clear and Easy to Read. Text, Audio, Search, Download

Bring your proof if you are truthful 2: Lastly, both assertions and rejections require a proof, according to verse 4: It's generally accepted [ by whom? In many of these verses the study of nature is "encouraged and highly recommended," and historical Islamic scientists like Al-Biruni and Al-Battani derived their inspiration from verses of the Quran.

The physicist Abdus Salam , in his Nobel Prize banquet address, quoted a well known verse from the Quran Salam also held the opinion that the Quran and the Islamic spirit of study and rational reflection was the source of extraordinary civilizational development. Salam was also careful to differentiate between metaphysics and physics, and advised against empirically probing certain matters on which "physics is silent and will remain so," such as the doctrine of "creation from nothing" which in Salam's view is outside the limits of science and thus "gives way" to religious considerations.

The Quran's message is conveyed with various literary structures and devices. In the original Arabic, the suras and verses employ phonetic and thematic structures that assist the audience's efforts to recall the message of the text. The language of the Quran has been described as "rhymed prose" as it partakes of both poetry and prose; however, this description runs the risk of failing to convey the rhythmic quality of Quranic language, which is more poetic in some parts and more prose-like in others.

Rhyme, while found throughout the Quran, is conspicuous in many of the earlier Meccan suras, in which relatively short verses throw the rhyming words into prominence. The effectiveness of such a form is evident for instance in Sura 81, and there can be no doubt that these passages impressed the conscience of the hearers. Frequently a change of rhyme from one set of verses to another signals a change in the subject of discussion. Later sections also preserve this form but the style is more expository.

The Quranic text seems to have no beginning, middle, or end, its nonlinear structure being akin to a web or net. Brown , acknowledges Brown's observation that the seeming disorganization of Quranic literary expression — its scattered or fragmented mode of composition in Sells's phrase — is in fact a literary device capable of delivering profound effects as if the intensity of the prophetic message were shattering the vehicle of human language in which it was being communicated. A text is self-referential when it speaks about itself and makes reference to itself.

According to Stefan Wild, the Quran demonstrates this metatextuality by explaining, classifying, interpreting and justifying the words to be transmitted. Self-referentiality is evident in those passages where the Quran refers to itself as revelation tanzil , remembrance dhikr , news naba' , criterion furqan in a self-designating manner explicitly asserting its Divinity, "And this is a blessed Remembrance that We have sent down; so are you now denying it? According to Wild the Quran is highly self-referential. The feature is more evident in early Meccan suras.

The Quran has sparked a huge body of commentary and explication tafsir , aimed at explaining the "meanings of the Quranic verses, clarifying their import and finding out their significance". Tafsir is one of the earliest academic activities of Muslims. According to the Quran, Muhammad was the first person who described the meanings of verses for early Muslims.

Exegesis in those days was confined to the explanation of literary aspects of the verse, the background of its revelation and, occasionally, interpretation of one verse with the help of the other. If the verse was about a historical event, then sometimes a few traditions hadith of Muhammad were narrated to make its meaning clear.

Because the Quran is spoken in classical Arabic , many of the later converts to Islam mostly non-Arabs did not always understand the Quranic Arabic, they did not catch allusions that were clear to early Muslims fluent in Arabic and they were concerned with reconciling apparent conflict of themes in the Quran. Following this commentary, a five volume English commentary was also published as The English Commentary of the Holy Quran [].

Esoteric or Sufi interpretation attempts to unveil the inner meanings of the Quran. Sufism moves beyond the apparent zahir point of the verses and instead relates Quranic verses to the inner or esoteric batin and metaphysical dimensions of consciousness and existence. They indicate possibilities as much as they demonstrate the insights of each writer. Sufi interpretation, according to Annabel Keeler, also exemplifies the use of the theme of love, as for instance can be seen in Qushayri's interpretation of the Quran.

Let me see you! Moses fell down unconscious. When he recovered, he said, 'Glory be to you! I repent to you! I am the first to believe! The mountain crumbles and Moses faints at the sight of God's manifestation upon the mountain. In Qushayri's words, Moses came like thousands of men who traveled great distances, and there was nothing left to Moses of Moses.

In that state of annihilation from himself, Moses was granted the unveiling of the realities.

From the Sufi point of view, God is the always the beloved and the wayfarer's longing and suffering lead to realization of the truths. Muhammad Husayn Tabatabaei says that according to the popular explanation among the later exegetes, ta'wil indicates the particular meaning a verse is directed towards. The meaning of revelation tanzil , as opposed to ta'wil , is clear in its accordance to the obvious meaning of the words as they were revealed. But this explanation has become so widespread that, at present, it has become the primary meaning of ta'wil , which originally meant "to return" or "the returning place".

In Tabatabaei's view, what has been rightly called ta'wil , or hermeneutic interpretation of the Quran, is not concerned simply with the denotation of words. Rather, it is concerned with certain truths and realities that transcend the comprehension of the common run of men; yet it is from these truths and realities that the principles of doctrine and the practical injunctions of the Quran issue forth.

Interpretation is not the meaning of the verse—rather it transpires through that meaning, in a special sort of transpiration. There is a spiritual reality—which is the main objective of ordaining a law, or the basic aim in describing a divine attribute—and then there is an actual significance that a Quranic story refers to. According to Shia beliefs, those who are firmly rooted in knowledge like Muhammad and the imams know the secrets of the Quran. According to Tabatabaei, the statement "none knows its interpretation except God" remains valid, without any opposing or qualifying clause.

But Tabatabaei uses other verses and concludes that those who are purified by God know the interpretation of the Quran to a certain extent. According to Tabatabaei , there are acceptable and unacceptable esoteric interpretations. Acceptable ta'wil refers to the meaning of a verse beyond its literal meaning; rather the implicit meaning, which ultimately is known only to God and can't be comprehended directly through human thought alone.

Values to live by according to the Quran

The verses in question here refer to the human qualities of coming, going, sitting, satisfaction, anger and sorrow, which are apparently attributed to God. Unacceptable ta'wil is where one "transfers" the apparent meaning of a verse to a different meaning by means of a proof; this method is not without obvious inconsistencies. Although this unacceptable ta'wil has gained considerable acceptance, it is incorrect and cannot be applied to the Quranic verses. The correct interpretation is that reality a verse refers to.

It is found in all verses, the decisive and the ambiguous alike; it is not a sort of a meaning of the word; it is a fact that is too sublime for words. God has dressed them with words to bring them a bit nearer to our minds; in this respect they are like proverbs that are used to create a picture in the mind, and thus help the hearer to clearly grasp the intended idea. One of the notable authors of esoteric interpretation prior to the 12th century is Sulami d. Sulami's major commentary is a book named haqaiq al-tafsir "Truths of Exegesis" which is a compilation of commentaries of earlier Sufis.

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From the 11th century onwards several other works appear, including commentaries by Qushayri d. These works include material from Sulami's books plus the author's contributions. Many works are written in Persian such as the works of Maybudi d. Rumi makes heavy use of the Quran in his poetry, a feature that is sometimes omitted in translations of Rumi's work. A large number of Quranic passages can be found in Mathnawi , which some consider a kind of Sufi interpretation of the Quran. Rumi's book is not exceptional for containing citations from and elaboration on the Quran, however, Rumi does mention Quran more frequently.

He reconciled notions of God's manifestation through and in the physical world with the sentiments of Sunni Islam. His work ruh al-Bayan the Spirit of Elucidation is a voluminous exegesis. Written in Arabic, it combines the author's own ideas with those of his predecessors notably Ibn Arabi and Ghazali. Unlike the Salafis and Zahiri, Shias and Sufis as well as some other Muslim philosophers believe the meaning of the Quran is not restricted to the literal aspect. Henry Corbin narrates a hadith that goes back to Muhammad:. The Quran possesses an external appearance and a hidden depth, an exoteric meaning and an esoteric meaning.

This esoteric meaning in turn conceals an esoteric meaning this depth possesses a depth, after the image of the celestial Spheres, which are enclosed within each other. So it goes on for seven esoteric meanings seven depths of hidden depth. According to this view, it has also become evident that the inner meaning of the Quran does not eradicate or invalidate its outward meaning. Rather, it is like the soul, which gives life to the body. Commentaries dealing with the zahir outward aspects of the text are called tafsir , and hermeneutic and esoteric commentaries dealing with the batin are called ta'wil "interpretation" or "explanation" , which involves taking the text back to its beginning.

Commentators with an esoteric slant believe that the ultimate meaning of the Quran is known only to God. Reappropriation is the name of the hermeneutical style of some ex-Muslims who have converted to Christianity. Their style or reinterpretation is ad hoc and unsystematized and geared towards apologetics. This tradition of interpretation draws on the following practices: Translating the Quran has always been problematic and difficult.

Many argue that the Quranic text cannot be reproduced in another language or form. Nevertheless, the Quran has been translated into most African , Asian , and European languages. The first fully attested complete translations of the Quran were done between the 10th and 12th centuries in Persian. Later in the 11th century, one of the students of Abu Mansur Abdullah al-Ansari wrote a complete tafsir of the Quran in Persian.

The manuscripts of all three books have survived and have been published several times.

Islamic tradition also holds that translations were made for Emperor Negus of Abyssinia and Byzantine Emperor Heraclius , as both received letters by Muhammad containing verses from the Quran. In , translations in languages were known. In , George Sale produced the first scholarly translation of the Quran into English; another was produced by Richard Bell in , and yet another by Arthur John Arberry in All these translators were non-Muslims. There have been numerous translations by Muslims.

The Ahmadiyya Muslim Community has published translations of the Quran in 50 different languages [] besides a five-volume English commentary and an English translation of the Quran. As with translations of the Bible, the English translators have sometimes favored archaic English words and constructions over their more modern or conventional equivalents; for example, two widely read translators, A.

Yusuf Ali and M.

Marmaduke Pickthall, use the plural and singular "ye" and "thou" instead of the more common " you ". The oldest Gurumukhi translation of the Quran Sharif in Gurmukhi has been found in village Lande of Moga district of Punjab which was printed in Arabic Quran with interlinear Persian translation from the Ilkhanid Era. The first printed Quran in a European vernacular language: The proper recitation of the Quran is the subject of a separate discipline named tajwid which determines in detail how the Quran should be recited, how each individual syllable is to be pronounced, the need to pay attention to the places where there should be a pause, to elisions , where the pronunciation should be long or short, where letters should be sounded together and where they should be kept separate, etc.

It may be said that this discipline studies the laws and methods of the proper recitation of the Quran and covers three main areas: In order to avoid incorrect pronunciation, reciters who are not native speakers of Arabic language follow a program of training in countries such as Egypt or Saudi Arabia.

The recitations of a few Egyptian reciters were highly influential in the development of the art of recitation. Southeast Asia is well known for world-class recitation, evidenced in the popularity of the woman reciters such as Maria Ulfah of Jakarta. There are two types of recitation: Mujawwad refers to a slow recitation that deploys heightened technical artistry and melodic modulation, as in public performances by trained experts.

It is directed to and dependent upon an audience for the mujawwad reciter seeks to involve the listeners.

The origins of the Koran: From revelation to holy book

Vocalization markers indicating specific vowel sounds were introduced into the Arabic language by the end of the 9th century. The first Quranic manuscripts lacked these marks, therefore several recitations remain acceptable. The variation in readings of the text permitted by the nature of the defective vocalization led to an increase in the number of readings during the 10th century. He studied various readings and their trustworthiness and chose seven 8th-century readers from the cities of Mecca , Medina , Kufa , Basra and Damascus.

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Ibn Mujahid did not explain why he chose seven readers, rather than six or ten, but this may be related to a prophetic tradition Muhammad's saying reporting that the Quran had been revealed in seven " ahruf " meaning seven letters or modes. This edition has become the standard for modern printings of the Quran. The variant readings of the Quran are one type of textual variant. Nasser categorizes variant readings into various subtypes, including internal vowels, long vowels, gemination shaddah , assimilation and alternation.

Occasionally, an early Quran shows compatibility with a particular reading. A Syrian manuscript from the 8th century is shown to have been written according to the reading of Ibn Amir ad-Dimashqi. Before printing was widely adopted in the 19th century, the Quran was transmitted in manuscripts made by calligraphers and copyists. The Hijazi style manuscripts nevertheless confirm that transmission of the Quran in writing began at an early stage. Probably in the ninth century, scripts began to feature thicker strokes, which are traditionally known as Kufic scripts.

Toward the end of the ninth century, new scripts began to appear in copies of the Quran and replace earlier scripts. The reason for discontinuation in the use of the earlier style was that it took too long to produce and the demand for copies was increasing. Copyists would therefore choose simpler writing styles. Naskh was in very widespread use.

More distinct is the Bihari script which was used solely in the north of India. In the beginning, the Quran did not have vocalization markings. The system of vocalization, as we know it today, seems to have been introduced towards the end of the ninth century. Since it would have been too costly for most Muslims to purchase a manuscript, copies of the Quran were held in mosques in order to make them accessible to people.

In terms of productivity, the Ottoman copyists provide the best example. This was in response to widespread demand, unpopularity of printing methods and for aesthetic reasons. Folio from the "Blue" Quran. Get your copy of The Qur'an Dilemma today! This extensively researched commentary examines Islam's holiest book, challenging serious readers to ponder its true origins and purposes as they increase their knowledge of Islam and its teachings. The Read section allows the visitor to the site to read the Quran in multiple languages and to view the commentaries, errors, abrogations, repetitions and readers comments.

The Topics section will allow visitors to view all the verses from the Quran relating to specific topics such as jihad, christians, jews, women, terrorism, and more. Visitors can view the list in different languages and translations. All registered users have the ability to comment on every abrogation, comparative reading, critical analysis and article.

Sign In Sign Up. Share a link to this page with your friends. The Quran Dilemma in English and Arabic. Examine a variety of historical variant readings of the Quran Read The Quran more clearly and accurately See abrogated verses alongside explanations within the text. Topics menu will always be here, always within reach. If you see a green icon like this , it means you're already logged in! But if you see, a red iconlike this , it means you are NOT logged in. It's all color coded. We'd love it if your icon is always green.

It makes us a community. Due to overwhelming content, each of these hubs can be considered a home page of its own. Faith is where the tenets, pillars and spiruality related content is found. Science section features not just Science but also Nature and Technology. This section is more for the technologically minded. World section is for the News Buds. Values section on the other hand is very special. We created it for only one thing in mind; to create a peaceful corner that features just inspiring and uplifting material, focused around Universal Values to be reflect upon -- at a time never needed more desperately than now Inspiring Themes Every other Friday, we try to feature a new theme which will uplift our spirituality.

Our themes mostly focus on the universal values such as compassion , patience , love and so on. We feature each theme with a beautiful image. Welcome to the world's oldest and most recognized Islamic Web site. Have a blessed Ramadan! Skip to content By: Mankind , Quran Values: Forgiveness , Justice , Respect Views: Quran's Message for Humanity.

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